November 29

Things to do in Montreal: 35 activities throughout the year

Finding things to do in Montreal has never been easier. Here’s our list of must-sees that every Montrealer or visitor should know, including the most beautiful monuments, iconic attractions, our famous bon vivant culture, restaurants, bars and the incomparable character that makes it one of the most incredible cities in the world. It’s a premier destination for tourists and a daily celebration for residents.

Summary

1. Explore the summit of Mount Royal and its surroundings

The centerpiece of Montreal and its namesake, this small mountain offers a breathtaking view in every direction when you explore all its walls.

Why go there? Covering 692 acres, Mount Royal is a vast municipal park that offers a taste of the outdoors without leaving the city limits. Whether exploring its wooded trails, picnicking in the shade or cross-country skiing on its kilometers of trails, every minute spent on the mountain offers either a refuge away from the city or a panoramic view of it.

The little extra? Admire the Montreal skyline year-round from the Chalet du Mont-Royal. In winter, drop by the equipment rental counter to skate, ski, or slide.

2. Eating Authentic on the Plateau-Mont-Royal

The essential addresses for Quebec and Montreal classics such as bagels, poutine and smoked meat are all located in this dynamic neighbourhood.

Why go there? This blend of three distinctive neighbourhoods – the Mile End, the Plateau and the McGill Ghetto – is known for having the best of the best of the best of the best of the best of the best of the best of the best; Fairmount and Saint-Viateur for freshly baked bagels, Schwartz’s for a Montreal smoked meat and cherry cola, and La Banquise for poutine at any time of the day or night.

The little extra? Begin or end your gastronomic-historical tour with a visit to an institution, with a special Wilensky’s sandwich at Wilensky’s Light Lunch or a mish-mash at Beautys.

3. Having fun until you drop at Cabaret Mado

What? The drag cabaret destination of Mado Lamotte, his diva majesty of the Gay Village.

Why go there? This cabaret, in operation for over three decades, is open seven days a week. It’s where you’ll find the most devilish drag performances for parties like nowhere else. Every night, there is a festive parade of costumes, music, comedy and dance featuring new queens, including stars from RuPaul’s Drag Race. Shows are usually in French with Madame Mado translating for the English, if they ask nicely. Friendly tip: the closer you sit to the stage, the more likely you are to be laughed at by the hostess.

The little extra? Take a bite at the chic 50s style dinner next door, La Dînette à Mado, for a boost of energy.

4. Dive headfirst into trade shows

What? A ton of street fairs, year-round, on the main street in a variety of neighbourhoods.

Why go there? A tour of any of Montreal’s fairs throughout the year reveals all kinds of activities, merchandise, musical performances, food to taste and beverages to enjoy. They take place mostly in May, June and July, such as when the Quartier Latin is closed to cars for the grand launch of the terrace season at the end of May, during the Grand-Prix on the weekend of June 7, or when the Plateau transforms a large section of Saint-Laurent Boulevard into a pedestrian street.

The little extra? Italian Week in Little Italy in early August, or during the Cabane Panache et Bois Rond fair at the end of March, when a section of Verdun brings the sugar shack to town.

5. Experience the essential sugar shack experience

Sometimes rustic, sometimes luxurious, these rural feasts are the best source of maple syrup around Montreal.

Why go there? Tap into local traditions. Every year, from February to the end of April, sugar shacks in the Montreal area collect the sap from the maple trees and boil it to produce a rich, sweet maple syrup. There’s no fooling about it – Quebec is the largest producer of maple syrup in the world. In a typical cabin, you’ll find a generous breakfast, live traditional music, children’s entertainment, sleigh rides and much more.

The little extra? Two luxurious versions of this great tradition by Chef Martin Picard from Le Pied de Cochon – the Cabane à Sucre Au Pied de Cochon and the Cabane d’à Côté – or an urban sugar shack on the island of Montreal.

6. Running Montreal’s underground stores

What? a veritable anthill, a huge deployment of interconnected underground tunnels in the heart of downtown. Direct access to metro stations, air-conditioned in summer, heated in winter.

Why go there? Since the entire circuit is the equivalent of a 30-kilometre walk, paying a single visit to this multi-level maze is never enough. It’s a network of functional passages that takes you from restaurants, to shopping malls, to downtown tourist attractions. It is one of the largest of its kind in the world, with half a million users daily.

The little extra? The indoor skating rink at 1000 de la Gauchetière, the fragment of the Berlin Wall at the World Trade Centre, and the Eaton Centre, the site of Time Out Market Montréal.

7. Strolling the streets of Old Montreal

What? First established in the 17th century by the first settlers of New France, the narrow cobblestone streets and foundations of Old Montreal are firmly rooted in its European history.

Why go there? This neighbourhood overlooking the St. Lawrence River is at the height of the city’s opulence. With some of Montreal’s most upscale restaurants, the opportunity for long window-shopping strolls, a few museums, historical monuments and a host of cultural attractions, there’s something to entertain you at any time of the day in this part of the city.

The little extra? Street artists at Place Jacques-Cartier, Inuit art at the Galerie d’art Images Boréales, sunbathing at the Plage de l’Horloge, or the Notre-Dame Basilica and its neo-gothic style.

Jean-Talon Market

8. Taste the Quebec terroir at the Jean-Talon market

What? dating back to 1933, the Jean-Talon public market hosts a variety of local producers, fishmongers, butchers, bakers, restaurateurs and grocers.

Why go there? The products found at the Jean-Talon Market and other markets, such as the Atwater Market, make them the true hubs of Montreal gastronomy. During the summer, they become open areas where you can explore and sample from seasonal pop-up restaurants, while in the winter, regular merchants make a place for themselves inside.

The little extra? Fresh produce and tastings of Quebec deli meats and cheeses are the main attraction, but be sure to grab a meal at El Rey Del Taco or Petit Alep.

9. Finding your animal side at the Biodome

What? An indoor zoo and aquarium that houses reconstructions of four North American and sub-antarctic island ecosystems.

Why go there? Originally built for the judo and cycling events of the 1976 Summer Olympics, the Montréal Biodome features thousands of animals of more than 200 different species, and 500 varieties of plants. The Biodôme is under renovation until the end of summer 2019, but a visit to its immediate neighbor, the Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium, promises an equally fascinating visit.

The little extra? The vegetation and humidity of its lush tropical forest in the middle of winter, or its collection of penguins, unique in Canada.

10. Go cheer on the Habs at the Bell Centre

What? experience the Montreal field hockey experience by cheering on the home team – the Montreal Canadiens, or Habs, from which “Habs” is derived – in a blue-white-red brouhaha of on-ice action.

Why go there? A visit to Montreal is incomplete without joining the thousands of fans chanting “Go Habs Go! especially when rival teams like the Boston Bruins and Toronto Maple Leafs are in town. If you didn’t make it to the box office on time, there’s nothing to worry about: there’s always a retailer in the corner chanting the slightly inflated ticket prices.

The little extra? If you can’t get in to watch the game, watch it either on the 46-foot screen or one of the 60 televisions in the 1909 Taverne Moderne sports bar at the Bell Centre.

11. Stroll to the Botanical Garden

A gargantuan collection of plant life spread over 190 acres of themed gardens, greenhouses, and Art Deco pavilions.

Why go there? The Botanical Garden, with its tens of thousands of plant varieties, is considered one of the most prestigious plant collections in the world. It is one of the city’s most popular attractions, which welcomes nonchalant walks as well as educational visits. Its space also houses the Insectarium, a natural history museum with 95 different species of insects.

The little extra? The Garden of China receives much deserved attention for its Gardens of Light, but other events such as Butterflies in the Wild and the Great Greenhouse Exhibition are also inspiring.

12. Partying in downtown clubs

If there’s one thing Montreal is known for, it’s its nightlife, with DJ nights and wild dance floors on both sides of this central district.

Why go there? The legal drinking age of 18, the prominent presence of university campuses within the city limits, and bars that close at 3 a.m., make Montreal historically known as a place to party most days of the week. Clubs that pulse to the beat of the bass, such as the Soubois forest restaurant and underground club, are popular places to spend the evening, followed by a visit to the Stereo afterhours club to dance the night away, literally until the wee hours of the morning.

The little extra? Visit a street where bars and clubs like Crescent Street are crowded during the weekend, especially if it’s time change time and everyone gets an extra hour at the bar.

13. Admire the view at the Olympic Stadium

What? a multi-use stadium built for the 1976 Summer Olympics, it is now a popular destination for its panoramic view of the city and for attending sporting events.

Why go there? There’s no bad time to get a new perspective of the city by climbing the 574-foot inclined tower elevator. The stadium also hosts a host of events throughout the year, from the diesel monster truck rallies to the lush green lawns of soccer and baseball games.

The little extra? The First Fridays Street Food Festival that takes place from May to October and brings together food trucks from all over the city, and when the Toronto Blue Jays come to town for a pregame.

14. Get your kicks with Cirque du Soleil

The internationally renowned Montreal circus company that synthesizes a multitude of circus traditions.

Why go there? The small troupe of street performers began in the late 1970s, and exploded into an imposing travelling circus. With its impressive costumes and harmonious passages from comedy, to acrobatics, to storytelling, the Circus amazes at every turn. His design and performance skills have led the Cirque to take up residence in Las Vegas, but he also tours internationally from late summer through the Montreal winter months.

The little extra? Take a pitcher of sangria at Terrasses Bonsecours before heading to the big top for a performance from mid-spring to mid-summer.

15. Discover art in all its forms at the Phi Centre

See the work of local and international artists at this multidisciplinary arts center. It features a range of works that are appreciated for their accomplished technique and post-modernist provocations.

Why go there? Established in Montreal by the same team as the DHC/ART Foundation, Centre Phi offers programming that includes all possible art forms, analog and technological. Whether it appeals to your auditory, visual, tactile, olfactory or gustatory senses, there is always something to surprise you. The space, designed with sustainable development in mind, also features a green roof, an urban garden and urban beehives.

The little extra? Keep an eye on its calendar for the next Food Core event, where chefs and food critics give immersive presentations on the basics of cooking, or performances from the Montreal storytelling event Confabulation.

16. Getting lost for a day at Parc Jean-Drapeau

What? 662 acres of huge green spaces, attractions, the site of a major festival, a Formula 1 race track and an amusement park, all spread over two islands.

Why go there? Often considered the launch pad for some of Montreal’s most impressive festivals – Osheaga, Heavy MTL and ’77 Montreal come to mind – this park is home to the annual Canadian Grand Prix on the Circuit Gilles-Villeneuve. It also houses relics of Expo 67, such as the Biosphere’s environmental museum and La Ronde amusement park. Stretch your legs and see where a day of exploration can take you.

The little extra? Go all black at the Casino de Montréal, and dance to the rhythm of electronic music at Piknic Electronik – which takes place on Sundays from May to September – or during Île Soniq in August.

17. Lighting up at the Jacques-Cartier Bridge

What? the bridge that connects the island of Montreal to the city of Longueuil is lit by a 365-color chromatic calendar.

Why go there? It’s better to get an intimate connection when admiring the decorative lighting of this bridge, which is linked to the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation and the 375th anniversary of Montreal. It’s also one of the best places, whether you’re on the bridge or near it, to watch the International des Feux de Loto-Québec, which began in 1985 and is one of the largest of its kind in the world.

The little extra? Go for it and embark on a four-hour gastronomic cruise to enjoy the lighting overlooking the river in style.

18. Dinner and movie at the Cinéma Moderne

What? an independent movie theatre in Mile End with a café and bar serving snacks and beverages to enjoy while watching a movie.

Why go there? Thanks to a super group of film veterans, Montreal has joined the film revolution with this movie theatre equipped with one of the best projectors and sound systems where you can dine, drink and watch. Enjoy coffee and baked goods during the day or alcoholic beverages at night before settling down to one of the carefully selected films. During the week, the programming stays fresh by changing daily, and the same goes for children’s movies on weekends, making it one of the best things in town to do as a family.

The little extra? Their special events, such as screenings followed by discussions with filmmakers, or going for brunch on weekends between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

19. Take a street art tour on Saint-Laurent

What? a walk along the Main River or its alleys to admire the graffiti of recognized and unknown artists.

Why go there? In early summer, the heart of Saint-Laurent Boulevard, between de Maisonneuve Boulevard to the south and Saint-Viateur Street to the north, sees a multitude of artists unleashing themselves with fresh paint. As for their spectators, they fill up on street festivals with their food kiosks and terraces enlarged for the occasion. All this produces great artistic pieces that remain for the rest of the year.

The little extra? Keep an eye out for local talent like Miss Me or Stikki Peaches, and aim for a visit to the Mural Festival in June and Under Pressure in August.

20. Getting out the quirks at the Tam-Tams

What? A local tradition, this outdoor festival takes place every Sunday of the summer around the Georges-Étienne Cartier Monument, which extends to the base of Mount Royal.

Why go there? From May to September, the area around the winged statue of the Fame is transformed into a huge circle of drums sifted with pot smoke. The surrounding lawn is filled with slackliners, role-playing battles, eclectic individuals and lots of good vibes. Everyone is invited to join in.

The little extra? Bring back a souvenir from one of the vendors, and taste the illegal food on sale on site to accompany the six-pack you should have brought.

21. Take a ride on Montreal’s Ferris Wheel

What? an observation wheel reaching a height of 60 meters with kaleidoscopic lighting. It is equipped with air-conditioned gondolas that welcome visitors year-round, offering a bird’s eye view of Old Montreal and downtown.

Why go there? Also known as the Montreal Observation Wheel, the Ferris Wheel was erected in Old Montreal to commemorate the city’s 375th anniversary. Designed in the image of similar structures in Chicago and Hong Kong, the panoramic view from this illuminated wheel makes it a picturesque attraction for tourists and a romantic outing for Montrealers.

The little extra? Get on board for the day and night package for alternative views of the city, or buy your tickets in advance for half the usual price.

22. Admire the cutting edge of art at the Musée d’art contemporain

What? Montreal’s premier destination for contemporary art collections featuring over 7,000 works by more than 1,500 national and international artists.

Why go there? Founded in 1964, the MAC was the first museum of contemporary art to establish itself in Canada. It regularly presents temporary exhibitions focusing on the visual and performing arts. Since its creation, the museum has become a space where Montrealers and tourists alike gather to admire provocative and contemplative works. It also offers lectures, workshops and brand new exhibitions every year.

The little extra? Visit the MAC during the annual Nuit Blanche pour la Nocturne festival, which features DJ and VJ performances as well as art workshops and temporary installations.

18. Dinner and movie at the Cinéma Moderne

What? an independent movie theatre in Mile End with a café and bar serving snacks and beverages to enjoy while watching a movie.

Why go there? Thanks to a super group of film veterans, Montreal has joined the film revolution with this movie theatre equipped with one of the best projectors and sound systems where you can dine, drink and watch. Enjoy coffee and baked goods during the day or alcoholic beverages at night before settling down to one of the carefully selected films. During the week, the programming stays fresh by changing daily, and the same goes for children’s movies on weekends, making it one of the best things in town to do as a family.

The little extra? Their special events, such as screenings followed by discussions with filmmakers, or going for brunch on weekends between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

19. Take a street art tour on Saint-Laurent

What? a walk along the Main River or its alleys to admire the graffiti of recognized and unknown artists.

Why go there? In early summer, the heart of Saint-Laurent Boulevard, between de Maisonneuve Boulevard to the south and Saint-Viateur Street to the north, sees a multitude of artists unleashing themselves with fresh paint. As for their spectators, they fill up on street festivals with their food kiosks and terraces enlarged for the occasion. All this produces great artistic pieces that remain for the rest of the year.

The little extra? Keep an eye out for local talent like Miss Me or Stikki Peaches, and aim for a visit to the Mural Festival in June and Under Pressure in August.

20. Getting out the quirks at the Tam-Tams

What? A local tradition, this outdoor festival takes place every Sunday of the summer around the Georges-Étienne Cartier Monument, which extends to the base of Mount Royal.

Why go there? From May to September, the area around the winged statue of the Fame is transformed into a huge circle of drums sifted with pot smoke. The surrounding lawn is filled with slackliners, role-playing battles, eclectic individuals and lots of good vibes. Everyone is invited to join in.

The little extra? Bring back a souvenir from one of the vendors, and taste the illegal food on sale on site to accompany the six-pack you should have brought.

21. Take a ride on Montreal’s Ferris Wheel

What? an observation wheel reaching a height of 60 meters with kaleidoscopic lighting. It is equipped with air-conditioned gondolas that welcome visitors year-round, offering a bird’s eye view of Old Montreal and downtown.

Why go there? Also known as the Montreal Observation Wheel, the Ferris Wheel was erected in Old Montreal to commemorate the city’s 375th anniversary. Designed in the image of similar structures in Chicago and Hong Kong, the panoramic view from this illuminated wheel makes it a picturesque attraction for tourists and a romantic outing for Montrealers.

The little extra? Get on board for the day and night package for alternative views of the city, or buy your tickets in advance for half the usual price.

22. Admire the cutting edge of art at the Musée d’art contemporain

What? Montreal’s premier destination for contemporary art collections featuring over 7,000 works by more than 1,500 national and international artists.

Why go there? Founded in 1964, the MAC was the first museum of contemporary art to establish itself in Canada. It regularly presents temporary exhibitions focusing on the visual and performing arts. Since its creation, the museum has become a space where Montrealers and tourists alike gather to admire provocative and contemplative works. It also offers lectures, workshops and brand new exhibitions every year.

The little extra? Visit the MAC during the annual Nuit Blanche pour la Nocturne festival, which features DJ and VJ performances as well as art workshops and temporary installations.

23. Marveling at the iconic architecture of Habitat 67

What? A housing complex designed by architect Moshe Safdie that looks like stacked cubes. It is one of the most famous attractions in Montreal.

Why go there? Whether you are an architecture lover or simply curious to see the city’s iconic buildings, Habitat 67 is a brutalist landmark in the Montreal landscape. What began as Moshe Safdie’s master’s thesis became a reality at the 1967 World’s Fair. Comprising 354 concrete forms 12 stories high and some 100 housing units, this structure that redefined urban residential life still offers 90-minute guided tours.

The little extra? You may see surfers or kayaks on the two-meter-high wave in the St. Lawrence River near the building. If you want to experience this, several adventure tourism companies will provide you with the necessary equipment.

24. Go adrift aboard Bota Bota

What? a ferry that has been converted into one of the city’s most popular spas, offering a sublime view of the Old Port and Habitat 67 and its relaxing neighbourhoods.

Why go there? Advertised as a “spa on the water”, this floating multi-storey building may not cast off and drift down the river, but a day on board is just as much fun. It offers a year-round Nordic water circuit with baths and saunas, as well as gardens to relax in during the summer.

The little extra? Treat yourself to one of its massages or treatments and then sit down at its restaurant La Traversée.

25. Paddle or pedal along the Lachine Canal.

What? 14.5 kilometers long, this canal is a National Historic Site and crosses the southwestern part of the island of Montreal, from the Old Port to Lake Saint-Louis.

Why go there? Each section of the canal generates different things to see, both on land and on water. The canal is bordered by one of the city’s most scenic bicycle paths, which runs from the Visitor Service Centre in the borough of Lachine for a bath in history, through the Saint-Henri district for lunch, and ends with a picturesque evening in Old Montreal.

The little extra? H2O Adventures’ swan-shaped pedal boats and electric boats add a touch of kitsch to your adventure. Otherwise, there is always the option of packing up on the St-Ambroise Terrace of the McAuslan Brewery.

26. See who’s on the billboard at M Telus

What? Montreal is one of the best places to explore the local music scene as well as to see international extravaganzas on tour, and M Telus is the best place to catch them.

Why go there? First a 19th century skating rink, then a movie theater, then a theater, the building that houses M Telus has been in the entertainment business for over a century. Known locally as Metropolis, it’s the place to see the big names (the Corona Theater comes to mind) but in more privacy than a stadium.

The little extra? Pre-drink a beer or three at the Foufounes Électriques or cocktails at the Midway Tavern, accompanied by hot dogs at the Montreal Pool Room (sorry, no pool tables here!).

27. Visit the sacred ground of Saint Joseph’s Oratory

With the largest church in Canada and one of the largest domes of its kind in the world, St. Joseph’s Oratory is for those in search of nature, culture and spirituality.

Why go there? Originally a small chapel erected in 1904, the basilica of today’s Oratory was completed in 1967, its reconstruction having been done in response to growing congregations. The basilica houses, on the one hand, a reliquary containing the heart of Saint Andrew of Montreal, a Montrealer whose faith is said to have had the ability to miraculously heal physical handicaps, and on the other hand, a large Beckerath organ with pipes up to 32 feet high.

The little plus? Go see the thousands of canes and crutches left by those who would have been healed by Brother André, or hear one of the public performances of the basilica’s organs.

28. Having eyes bigger than a belly in Chinatown

What? the original neighborhood and cultural center crossed by the short pedestrian segment of De la Gauchetière. Full to bursting with restaurants, stores and bars.

Why go there? The 1877 collection of laundries has grown into an area whose distinctive character is hard to find elsewhere in the city. There are shopping carts overflowing with Sunday Dim Sum brunches at Ruby Rouge, spun candy at Dragon’s Beard Candy, culinary feats at Lan Zhou Noodles and bamboo cookers exploding with dumplings at Qing Hua.

The little extra? Catch your breath by visiting the koi carp that inhabit the indoor pool of the Holiday Inn (surmounted by a pagoda), before moving on to the western section of Chinatown surrounding the downtown campus of Concordia University.

29. A round of applause at the Quartier des spectacles

The obvious place to go for entertainment, cultural events in eight zones, and the main site of some of Montreal’s most renowned festivals.

Why go there? With its summer programming that includes the Just for Laughs comedy festival, the International Jazz Festival (the largest in the world), and public art installations, this neighbourhood can boast of being the center of attention for most of the week. It’s also the place to see the elegant performances of the Montreal Symphony Orchestra and the Opéra de Montréal.

The little extra? Art installations combining light and music in the context of Light Therapy to dispel winter depression, while the screenings at the Cinémathèque québécoise never disappoint.

30. Letting yourself be touched by the Café Cléopâtre

A perfect example of Montreal’s neon-bathed history, there are exotic dancers on the first floor with a cabaret upstairs offering burlesque, vaudeville and drag performances.

Why go there? Café Cleopatra is one of the few businesses that have remained intact after the Red Light’s transformation and is part of the reason why Montreal was known as the Paris of North America. Its clientele tends to be quite local, except when the Café hosts shows as part of Just for Laughs or Montreal’s Fetish Weekend.

The little extra? Bareoké, which takes place on the first Saturday of the month, combines karaoke and striptease and is open to anyone who wants to give it a try. It’s friendlier than it sounds with an audience that goes there to have fun rather than to judge.

31. Maintaining your love of reading at the Drawn & Quarterly bookstore

What? A bookstore in Mile End, owned by a Canadian publishing house, specializing in comic books and graphic novels by national and international authors.

Why go there? Drawn and Quarterly has been publishing comic books since 1990 and opened its bookstore in 2007, which has greatly contributed to its popularity. The bookstore has since become a gathering place for the local literary elite, and also hosts launches of well-known authors. It’s not just about comic books either, and there’s also a selection of novels and non-fiction.

The little extra? The lively dynamics of the regularly scheduled author readings, and the Free Comics Saturday and the Montreal Comics Festival, both in May.

 

32. Tasting artisanal beers at God’s house!

A local microbrewery that specializes in the production of tasty, traditional and experimental beers. Popular with Montrealers and tourists alike.

Why go there? There’s no shortage of places in Montreal to drink a good homemade beer these days, but Dieu du Ciel! is usually the first to come out on top for its ability to produce a wide range of sparkling pints. With its ever-changing slate of concoctions, Dieu du Ciel! attracts long line-ups and offers tables that are crowded no matter what the season, but the wait is worth it.

The little extra? Order a bottle either from their pantheon of recipes cast in concrete, or from another in development that incorporates fruits, flowers, spices or sweets.

33. Losing your mind in the Satosphere projection room

What? 360-degree spherical projection screen featuring outstanding audio-visual presentations, movies, dance parties and games, all offered in a fascinating concept room.

Why go there? As part of the Society for Arts and Technology, an artist and research center focused on immersive technologies, the Satosphere is the first place of its kind in Montreal and its surroundings. With its 157 speakers and regular programming that incorporates virtual reality, VJs and DJs, it is a more than unique experience.

The little extra? Everything is also on the third floor, such as the outdoor terrace and Foodlab, a farm-to-table restaurant that serves cocktails and a great biodynamic wine.

34. Breaking the Orange Julep Crust

What? A popular attraction and snack in Côte-de-Neiges in the shape of a giant orange, which serves an orange juice beverage with a distinctive creamy taste.

Why go there? A snack dating back to the early 1930’s, the Orange Julep is a popular stop for drivers pining for its beverage and a bite of its hot dogs and poutines. Once part of a popular chain in Montreal, this is now the only remaining location and remains open late in the warmer months.

The little extra? Wednesdays from May to August, during which enthusiasts of old-fashioned beauty come to park their beauties. With the orange globe in the background, this is a popular destination for instagrammers.

35. Dancing in the sand at the Village au Pied-du-Courant

A public space reinvented as a laboratory of urban life where bars, chefs, musicians and the public dip their toes in the sand and bask in hammocks.

Why go there? Located on the shores of the St. Lawrence River in the Hochelaga-Maisonneuve district, this space can be counted on to offer events for the whole family and parties every weekend. A series of bar and canteen kiosks, green spaces and beach parties assembled from shipping containers, garlands of lights and recycled materials give the impression of a trip to the beaches of the south without leaving the city.

The little extra? When musicians perform on its terrace, and when the village opens (occasionally and exceptionally) for the International des Feux de Loto-Québec.


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